Jerome Taylor, Ph.D. Chair & Associate Professor University of Pittsburgh Department of Africana Studies



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Area(s) of Interest:
Educational Disparities

Biography

Jerome Taylor, PhD, completed his undergraduate education at the University of Denver and his doctoral training at Indiana University of Bloomington (IND). In graduate school his research focused on examining how population density affects brain neurochemistry and the nervous system. After completing graduate school, he received and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in child and adolescent psychology at the Menninger Clinic of Topeka, KS. Subsequently, he has served as director of the Clinical Psychology Center, as chair of the Graduate Program in Social Psychology, and as chair of the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. In Psychology he chaired more than 25 dissertation committees of black students—the record number of black PhD’s supervised by any faculty member in the history of Pitt’s Department of Psychology. These former students now serve as tenured professors, department chairs, college deans, provosts, and presidents and as successful civic leaders, elected politicians, agency heads, and clinical practitioners.

His work has been recognized locally in Pittsburgh (University Chancellor’s Distinguished Public Service Award and University of Pittsburgh Black Alumni Pioneer in Civil Rights Award), and at national and international levels (highest award for research and development activities from the international Association of Black Psychologists). The Center for Family Excellence, which he founded, has been recognized as one of the best managed non-profit organizations in the region (Alfred W. Wishart Jr. Award) and its violence prevention program has been rated as the best in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Dr. Taylor has been invited to present papers describing his research and development activities at institutions of higher learning that are predominately black (e.g., Howard, Hampton, Florida A & M) and predominately white (e.g., Princeton, Yale, Oxford in England).